Teenage dating violence group activities

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Strategy Educating teens about abusive relationships helps prevent teen dating violence.

Community Problem Addressed In dating situations, youth test their concepts of masculinity, femininity, respect, mutuality, and communication.

Many victims of domestic violence, too, are young women.

Experts believe that violence between dating teens is severely underreported.

Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.

A 2011 CDC nationwide survey found that 23% of females and 14% of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who — Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

Talk with your teen about the dangers of dating and educate her about the risks of certain behaviors.Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.Many parents create strict rules about dating to try to keep their teens safe.Others regard teen dating as a natural part of the maturation process—an activity not without its risks but not a threat to the teen's health and safety.This strategy trains youth to prevent dating violence.

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